Top 10 Sat Navs for Bikes & Cyclists

Cyclists, you don’t have to get lost anymore! And if you do get lost, at least take your heart-rate reading while doing so. Garmin is leading the pack of GPS manufacturers in bringing a number of SAT NAV systems to the market specifically designed for bikes and the cyclist. GPS watches are also among the slew of products available, and here Polar joins the crew. Let’s look at some options.

Garmin Edge 705

Garmin Edge 705

Garmin’s Edge 705 leads the way in the latest cyclist GPS wizardry; a must-have for any avid cyclist who likes to take the road less travelled, or explore territory in countries not yet explored.
It features a speed/cadence sensor, as well as a heart-rate monitor. It offers a colour display (sunlight readable, no less) and measures speed, time, distance, altitude, calories burnt and descent, plus some other features. The Edge 705 makes use of wireless sensors to receive relevant data. The Edge 705 comes with a built-in base map, as well as a microSD card slot for adding additional maps, such as street-level maps or TOPO maps.
The Edge 705 is also available without the speed/cadence sensor.

Garmin Edge 605

Garmin Edge 605

The Edge 605 is the model down from the Edge 705, and also comes with a sunlight readable colour display. It does not, however, offer a heart-rate monitor, but measures distance, speed, time, altitude, calories burnt, climb, descent and some other relevant information.
Like the 705, the Edge 605 also comes with a base map and microSD slot. Street-level maps and TOPO maps can be utilised.
The 605 is easy to set up. There’s no need for calibration or wheel sensors, and switching between bikes is a cinch.

Garmin Edge 500

Garmin Edge 500

The Edge 500 is two models down from the flagship 705, but is not to be laughed at. It does not feature a colour display, but measures speed, time, distance, altitude, calories burnt, climb, descent and more.
The Edge 500 comes bundled with a speed/cadence sensor, as well as heart-rate monitor. Like the 605, it makes use of wireless technology to receive data.
The Edge 500 allows you to track your progress through Garmin’s Virtual Partner.
This model is easy to use, requiring no wheel sensors or calibration, which also allows for easy switching between bicycles.
The Edge 500 is also available without the speed/cadence sensor and heart-rate monitor.

Garmin Dakota 20

Garmin Dakota 20

Garmin’s Dakota 20 is a tough entry-level touch-screen GPS featuring a sunlight-readable screen. It is a solid-built GPS with an onboard altimeter, worldwide base map, colour display, wireless data sharing capability, three-axis electronic compass and microSD slot.

Garmin Forerunner 305

Garmin Forerunner 305

The Garmin Forerunner series of watches is Garmin’s trek into the world of GPS watches. It is somewhat of a beast, and offers the user a host of different functions. The 305 has a high-sensitivity GPS receiver, a courses feature and wireless heart-rate monitor.
With the Forerunner 305 you can monitor your heart-rate, and receive data on the device wirelessly. The courses feature allows you to track your fitness progress by comparing current exercise data on any given track to previous results. The 305′s GPS reception is also refined for use near tall buildings or underneath tree cover.

Garmin Forerunner 405CX

Garmin Forerunner 405CX

Unlike the 305, which is quite a big GPS watch, the 405CX is smaller, and looks more like a digital wrist-watch than a GPS monitor.
However, they say that dynamite often comes in small packages; and this is certainly the case with the 405. The 405CX tracks your pace, distance covered, calories burnt and heart-rate, and sends this data to your PC wirelessly.
If having the 405CX is not enough, then find comfort in the fact that there are many optional extras available to suit your needs.

Garmin Forerunner 110

Garmin Forerunner 110

Forerunner 110 offers no bells and whistles; it’s just an easy-to-use wrist-watch style GPS that shows how far you’ve run, and at what speed. It requires hardly any setup; to use it, you simply press start when you start your run or walk. It displays time, distance and average pace.

Polar FT80

Polar FT80

Polar’s FT80 series is a really good-looking GPS watch. it features the following: automatic age-based target zone; heart-rate (average & max); calorie expenditure; data transfer via Polar FlowLink; G1 GPS sensor; graphical target zone indicator; backlight; dual time zone; stopwatch; water resistance (up to 50m).

Polar RS300X G1

Polar RS300X G1

Polar’s RS300 G1 is a fantastic watch. It’s larger than the FT80, and to be honest, it doesn’t have quite the same sleek look; but what it lacks in looks, it makes up for in functionality.
The backlit RS300 G1 offers the sport fanatic a host of different functions, and then some. First off, the watch is equipped with a setup wizard, making it easy to get up and running (pun intended). It offers a heart-rate monitor with graphical target zone indicator, as well as visual and audible target zone alarms.
The watch does not come with a bike mount, but this is an available extra. Data transfer happens through Polar’s FlowLink, and can be linked to polarpersonaltrainer.com, Polar’s extremely popular online virtual personal trainer.
And for those who get lost easily, it offers a GPS system.

Satsports Multisport GPS

Satsports Multisport GPS

Satsport specialises in sport GPS systems. Their Multisport GPS can be used for a number of different sports, including cycling.
The device offers a long battery life, and a bright screen. Make use of built-in software synced with desktop software to track your progress in your favourite activity.
Real-time stats include the tracking of altitude, speed and distance. Real-time graphs display elevation, pace and speed on a map.

So there you have it! No more excuses for getting home late anymore. With a proper GPS, your other half will know that your time was spent at the watering hole.